The Secret To Winter Exercise You Need To Know

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The holiday season is strange. It’s filled with happy things, like food, family, and fun, but as the season grows colder and darker, and the holidays throw your schedule off kilter, you end up getting out of whack, too. Exercise gets put off until the New Year when you realize that a whole ‘nother year has passed, and you haven’t made any progress – or worse, you’ve gone backward – on your health goals. Well, I’m here to tell you that this doesn’t have to be the case. There are some secrets to exercising in the winter.

Okay, I’ll admit I did click bait you just a little with the title of this post. There is no secret, per se, to getting good exercise in winter. First off it’s not just one secret, but several. Also, the secrets are not bound by any season. Excuses like, “it’s too cold today,” or “it’s too dark outside,” or “I’m too busy” are just that: excuses. They can be and are used all year-round. The same goes for the “secrets” I’m about to share – they can be used all year-round, too.

So listen up. These principles will help you exercise regularly, regardless of location, people, time, climate, and virtually any other excuse for not exercising.

1. What is your “why”?

The biggest reason people don’t exercise is because they cannot find a good enough reason to do it. It may sound too simple to be true but please read on, because it’s true. If the reason isn’t important to you, you’re not going to spend the time and effort on it.

There’s a flip side to this. Nowadays, medical care is so good that a lot of people just don’t care about their health. They think, when I have my heart attack they’ll just put one of those stent things in me through my wrist and I’ll go home in a day. As a cardiologist, I see this all the time. Years ago, heart attack patients used to have to be placed under medical care for months. (The medical community stopped requiring this after many of those patients died from blood clots from inactivity). When I was in training to be a cardiologist, the typical stay after a heart attack was one week. In the past twenty years, that has dropped down to just 48 hours for an uncomplicated heart attack! It’s no wonder people don’t worry about their health – it just doesn’t seem as serious as it did before!

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Exercise Beats Diet in Reducing Breast Cancer Risk

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Women who lose weight by exercising and eating better may reduce their risk of breast cancer more than women who lose the same amount of weight through diet alone, according to a new study of postmenopausal women. 

Both exercising and eating better are thought to reduce women’s risk of breast cancer by decreasing body fat and levels of the sex hormones related tobreast cancer, according to the researchers. But the researchers investigated whether there is any additional benefit to exercising, beyond the effect of weight loss in reducing cancer risk.

The results suggest exercising has a stronger effect on breast cancers fueled by hormones, compared with dieting, and also offers additional benefits such as preserving lean body mass, said study researcher Anne Maria May, of the University Medical Center Utrecht, in the Netherlands. “Exercise is the preferred weight loss strategy to decrease breast cancer risk,” May said. [7 Cancers You Can Ward Off with Exercise]

About 240 overweight women, ages 50 to 69, who didn’t regularly exercise participated in the study, presented here this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The women’s goal was to lose 11 to 13 pounds (5 to 6 kilograms) over 16 weeks. About one-third of the women dieted, whereas another third enrolled in an endurance and strength training program, working out for four hours weekly. They also followed a slightly healthier diet, with a small decrease in their calorie intake. The rest of the participants didn’t change their habits, and served as controls for the study.

By the end of the study, women in both the exercising and dieting groups achieved their weight-loss goals. However, the exercising participants preserved their lean body mass (which includes muscles and bones), and reduced more of their body fat, compared with the dieting participants.

Moreover, blood tests showed the exercising participants reduced their levels of estrogen more than dieting participants did. (Many breast cancers need estrogen to grow.) Compared with women in the control group, the exercising women showed decreases in all types of estrogen in the body, whereas women in the diet group showed a decrease in only one type of estrogen, according to the study.

The researchers also found the exercising group showed a benefit in levels of other breast cancer related hormones, such as testosterone. It is likely that physical activity influences sex hormone levels mainly through reducing body fat, May said. The findings demonstrate the importance of exercising for postmenopausal women, she said. Previous studies have shown that lack of physical activity is one of the risk factors for developing breast cancer. Other than influencing the sex hormones, it is possible that exercising affects women’s cancer risk by reducing inflammation in the body, or decreasing levels of the hormone insulin, studies have suggested.

Source: Live Science / Photo: The Prospect

5 Studies You May Have Missed

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Here’s a roundup of five medical studies published this week that might give you new insights into your health, mind and body. Remember, correlation is not causation – so if a study finds a connection between two things, it doesn’t mean that one causes the other. Read more

This article includes

Source: CNN Health. Photo Credit: Tom Grill/Getty Images

Exercise May Be the Most Effective Weapon Against Aging

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Keeping active may be the secret to staying young for both mice and men. Researchers from Canada’s McMaster University discovered that endurance exercise could halt the aging process in a group of mice, even though they were genetically engineered to age faster.

These furry creatures continued to exhibit the same youthful appearance as normal mice after engaging in a treadmill exercise routine over a period of several months. In addition, the exercise program prevented premature aging in almost every organ of the morphed mice. Details on the mighty mice can be found in the journal.

The results of the analysis indicate that not only can exercise help to prevent an early death, it can also delay the aging process. The researchers said that the exercise routine provided nearly 100 percent protection against graying fur, hair loss, brain and muscle atrophy, and more.

Read the full article here.