Exercise Beats Diet in Reducing Breast Cancer Risk

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Women who lose weight by exercising and eating better may reduce their risk of breast cancer more than women who lose the same amount of weight through diet alone, according to a new study of postmenopausal women. 

Both exercising and eating better are thought to reduce women’s risk of breast cancer by decreasing body fat and levels of the sex hormones related tobreast cancer, according to the researchers. But the researchers investigated whether there is any additional benefit to exercising, beyond the effect of weight loss in reducing cancer risk.

The results suggest exercising has a stronger effect on breast cancers fueled by hormones, compared with dieting, and also offers additional benefits such as preserving lean body mass, said study researcher Anne Maria May, of the University Medical Center Utrecht, in the Netherlands. “Exercise is the preferred weight loss strategy to decrease breast cancer risk,” May said. [7 Cancers You Can Ward Off with Exercise]

About 240 overweight women, ages 50 to 69, who didn’t regularly exercise participated in the study, presented here this week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The women’s goal was to lose 11 to 13 pounds (5 to 6 kilograms) over 16 weeks. About one-third of the women dieted, whereas another third enrolled in an endurance and strength training program, working out for four hours weekly. They also followed a slightly healthier diet, with a small decrease in their calorie intake. The rest of the participants didn’t change their habits, and served as controls for the study.

By the end of the study, women in both the exercising and dieting groups achieved their weight-loss goals. However, the exercising participants preserved their lean body mass (which includes muscles and bones), and reduced more of their body fat, compared with the dieting participants.

Moreover, blood tests showed the exercising participants reduced their levels of estrogen more than dieting participants did. (Many breast cancers need estrogen to grow.) Compared with women in the control group, the exercising women showed decreases in all types of estrogen in the body, whereas women in the diet group showed a decrease in only one type of estrogen, according to the study.

The researchers also found the exercising group showed a benefit in levels of other breast cancer related hormones, such as testosterone. It is likely that physical activity influences sex hormone levels mainly through reducing body fat, May said. The findings demonstrate the importance of exercising for postmenopausal women, she said. Previous studies have shown that lack of physical activity is one of the risk factors for developing breast cancer. Other than influencing the sex hormones, it is possible that exercising affects women’s cancer risk by reducing inflammation in the body, or decreasing levels of the hormone insulin, studies have suggested.

Source: Live Science / Photo: The Prospect

What are the health benefits of mangoes?

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The mango is a member of the drupe family, a type of plant food in which an outer fleshy part surrounds a shell (what we sometimes call a pit) with a seed inside. Olives, dates and coconuts are also types of drupes.

There are many different kinds of mangoes that range in color, shape, flavor and seed size. While the skin color of mangoes can vary from green to red, yellow or orange, the inner flesh of the mango is mostly a golden yellow. They have a sweet and creamy taste and contain over 20 vitamins and minerals.

Mangoes have been named the most widely consumed fruit in the world. Some of the possible health benefits of consuming mango include a decreased risk of macular degeneration, a decreased risk of colon cancer, improvement in digestion and bone health and even benefits for the skin and hair.

This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. It provides a nutritional breakdown of mangoes and an in-depth look at its possible health benefits, how toincorporate more mangoes into your diet and any potential health risks of consuming mangoes. Read more.

Source and Photo Credit: Medical News Today

Bill Clinton declares Vegan Victory!

Bill Clinton

The former president, known for his love of burgers, barbecue and junk food, has gone from a meat lover to a vegan, the strictest form of a vegetarian diet. He says he eats fruits, vegetables and beans, but no red meat, chicken or dairy.

Clinton, 65, who had quadruple bypass surgery in 2004 and then stent surgery in 2010, is following this eating plan to improve his heart health. He talked about his plant-based diet last year, saying he lost 24 pounds on it for his daughter Chelsea’s wedding, and he chatted about it again recently on TV, drawing national attention to the potential health benefits of this type of diet.

Read more.

What are the eight most popular diets today?

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There are literally hundreds of thousands of diets. Some are for losing weight, others for gaining weight, lowering cholesterol, living a long and healthy life, etc. The Mediterranean Diet, for example, reflects the culinary habits of southern European people.

The word diet comes from Old French diete and Medieval Latindieta meaning “a daily food allowance”. The Latin word diaetaand Greek word diaita mean “a way of life, a regimen”.
A diet can be described as a set course of eating and drinking in which the kind and amount of food one should eat is been planned out in order to achieve weight loss or follow a certain lifestyle.

This Medical News Today information article provides details on the most popular diets according to three criteria: how many articles there are around about these diets/lifestyles, how popular they seem to be generally, and how often we receive feedback on them.

Diets mentioned in this article include: the Atkins Dietthe Zone Diet, the vegetarian diet, … Read more.

Source: Medical News Today, Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

What’s wrong with what we eat?

In this fiery and funny talk, New York Times food writer Mark Bittman weighs in on what’s wrong with the way we eat now (too much meat, too few plants; too much fast food, too little home cooking), and why it’s putting the entire planet at risk.

Mark Bittman is a bestselling cookbook author, journalist and television personality. His friendly, informal approach to home cooking has shown millions that fancy execution is no substitute for flavor and soul.

How to live to be 100+

Really impressive talk on the world’s longest-lived peoples, given by Dan Buettner, National Geographic writer and explorer.


To find the path to long life and health, Dan Buettner and team study the world’s “Blue Zones,” communities whose elders live with vim and vigor to record-setting age. In his talk, he shares the 9 common diet and lifestyle habits that keep them spry past age 100.