Advantages of Soy

Tofu, soymilk, miso, tempeh, edamame—these and other soy products, including the soybeans themselves, are high in nutrients you tend to associate with other legumes, including fiber, iron, magnesium, potassium, protein, and zinc.

Soybeans naturally contain a class of phytoestrogens called isoflavones. People hear the word “estrogen” in the word “phytoestrogens” and assume that means soy has estrogen-like effects. Not necessarily. Estrogen has positive effects in some tissues and potentially negative effects in others. For example, high levels of estrogen can be good for the bones but can increase the likelihood of developing breast cancer. Ideally, you’d like what’s called a “selective estrogen receptor modulator” in your body that would have proestrogenic effects in some tissues and antiestrogenic effects in others. Well, that’s what soy phytoestrogens appear to be. Soy seems to lower breast cancer risk, an antiestrogenic effect, but can also help reduce menopausal hot-flash symptoms, a proestrogenic effect. So, by eating soy, you may be able to enjoy the best of both worlds.

What about soy for women with breast cancer? Overall, researchers have found that women diagnosed with breast cancer who ate the most soy lived significantly longer and had a significantly lower risk of breast cancer recurrence than those who ate less. The quantity of phytoestrogens found in just a single cup of soymilk may reduce the risk of breast cancer returning by 25 percent. The improvement in survival for those eating more soy foods was found both in women whose tumors were responsive to estrogen (estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer) and those whose tumors were not (estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer). This also held true for both young women and older women. In one study, for example, 90 percent of the breast cancer patients who ate the most soy phytoestrogens after diagnosis were still alive five years later, while half of those who ate little to no soy were dead.

Soy consumption has also been shown to benefit our kidneys, which appear to handle plant protein very differently from animal protein. Within hours of eating meat, our kidneys rev up into hyperfiltration mode. But, an equivalent amount of plant protein causes virtually no noticeable stress on the kidneys. Eat some tuna, and within three hours, your kidney filtration rate can shoot up 36 percent. But eating the same amount of protein in the form of tofu doesn’t appear to place any additional strain on the kidneys.

From: https://nutritionfacts.org/topics/soy/

Global Wellness Day

Have you heard of “Global Wellness Day”? Wellness is far more than spa and beauty. They define wellness as:

“Wellness is an active process of becoming aware of and making choices towards a healthy and fulfilling life.  It is more than being free from illness, it is a dynamic process of change and growth. A good or satisfactory condition of existence; a state characterized by health, happiness, and prosperity; welfare.

“Wellness is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” – The World Health Organization.”

In their 7 step manifesto they promote

  1. walking an hour a day
  2. drinking more water
  3. don’t use plastic bottles
  4. eat healthy food
  5. do a good deed
  6. have a family dinner with your loved ones
  7. sleep at 10:00pm

Sound familiar to anything you know?

This year its on Saturday June 10. Is there a way we can use this to connect with people?

Check out there website for more info at http://www.globalwellnessday.org

The Whole package-Synergistic effects

This below is an Abstract from Article that shows that healing and protecting properties of the carotenoids from tomatoes working in the best way when those  are in the combination, as God created them!

“For My hand made all these things, Thus all these things came into being,” declares the LORD Isaiah 66.2

Synergistic effects

Lycopene is the major carotenoid in tomatoes. Tomatoes contain a matrix of many bioactive components, including vitamin C, vitamin E, other carotenoids (a-, β-, γ- carotene, lutein), and flavonoids. Their synergistic interactions, when used in combination, may be responsible for the observed beneficial effects of tomato-based products. This study investigated the synergistic antioxidant activity of lycopene in combination with β-carotene, vitamin E, and lutein. A liposome system was used to test the synergistic antioxidant activity. The carotenoid mixtures were more efficient in protecting liposome from oxidation than the individual carotenoid .Research Article

Authors: Shi, John | Kakuda, Yukio | Yeung, David

VegMed Congress 2016

Veg Med Berlin

Scientific Congress – Vegetarian based diet and medicine

For Doctors, Students and Health Professions with focus on diet and nutrition

WHEN? 22-24. April 2016

WHERE? Berlin, Germany

Scientific presentations by leading researchers & renowned medical practitioners (Garry Fraser and Mark Messina from Loma Linda University), practice-oriented workshops, a platform for professional networking, a delicious plant-based buffet, public day “Open VegMed” and more.

REGISTER HERE

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Wissenschaftlicher Kongress – Vegetarische Ernährung und Medizin

Für Ärzte, Studierende und Gesundheitsberufe mit Schwerpunkt Ernährung

WANN: 22.-24. April 2016

WO? Berlin, Deutschland

Wissenschaftliche Vorträge weltweit führender Forscher & renommierter Ärzte (u.a.Garry Fraser und Mark Messina aus Loma Linda) , praxis­orientierte Workshops, Platt­formen für professionelles Networking, ein pflanzliches Bio-Feinschmecker-Büfett, Publikumstag „Open VegMed“ und mehr.

HIER ANMELDEN

 

Can we eat to starve cancer?

How can we conquer one of the most tragic conditions ?

William Li presents a new way to think about treating cancer and other diseases: anti-angiogenesis, preventing the growth of blood vessels that feed a tumor. The crucial first (and best) step: Eating cancer-fighting foods that cut off the supply lines and beat cancer at its own game. Witness William Li’s interesting talk at TED (c).

WHO classifies processed meats like bacon as carcinogenic

processedMeat1

Here comes an English version!

“According to a report by a World Health Organisation agency red meats are linked to cause cancer in humans. The determination, published by a panel of researchers for the International Agency for Research on Cancer in a medical journal Monday, classifies processed meat products like salami and bacon carcinogenic to humans, the strongest level of risk for cancer, and a category shared with tobacco smoke and diesel engine exhaust.

A metaanalyse of more than 800 studies by the commettee followed many people over time. Surprisingly one of the result turned out that even small amounts of daily consumption of meat are associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Some of the studies showed that there was 17% increase in the risk of colorectal cancer for every 100 grams per a day of red meat consumed and an 18% increase for ever 50 grams daily of processed meat…”

Read a full article from Wall Street Journal: http://www.wsj.com/articles/red-meats-potentially-cause-cancer-group-says-1445860101

WHO stuft verarbeitetes Fleisch als krebserregend ein

processedMeat1

Wahnsinn, jetzt ist es offiziell so. Die WHO stuft – basierend auf 800 Studien – verarbeitetes Fleisch als krebserregend ein: https://www.tagesschau.de/inland/who-fleisch-krebs-101.html

“Das Risiko steigt demnach umso stärker, je mehr Fleisch ein Mensch isst. “Jede verzehrte Portion verarbeiteten Fleischs von täglich 50 Gramm erhöht das Darmkrebsrisiko um 18 Prozent”, hieß es in der IARC-Studie. Eine Arbeitsgruppe aus 22 Experten hatte mehr als 800 Studien über die Folgen des Fleischkonsums ausgewertet. (…) Es gebe “starke Anzeichen” für einen direkten Zusammenhang zwischen dem Konsum von rotem Fleisch und dem Risiko, an Darm-, Bauchspeicheldrüsen- und Prostatakrebs zu erkranken.”

The Okinawa Diet: Living to 100

What would happen if you centered your diet around vegetables, the most nutrient-dense food group?

“The plant-based nature of the diet may trump the caloric restriction, though, since the one population that lives even longer than the Okinawa Japanese don’t just eat a 98% meat-free diet, they eat 100% meat-free. The Adventist vegetarians in California, with perhaps the highest life expectancy of any formally described population.”