Effects on Sunlight upon our body

Sunlight has had some bad publicity recently. The impression has been given that even small amounts of sun are harmful. While it is true that excessive sunlight can increase the risk of skin cancer and cataracts, sun in moderate amounts has many benefits.

Life and Health

CC Dawn Ellner on Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturesdawn/4299041739/in/photolist-7xTHki-8iSNsh-7DBkm6-8i2BcQ-8h4oJQ-58g3mv-7AVLrD-5fnAdK-7JeASf-58keQj-58kdYE-58kcWf-58g2ba-58g2AT-58kdx1-58kdEu

Without sunlight, life as we know it could not exist. Fruits and vegetables that receive the direct rays of the sun grow much better than those that are exposed to artificial light. This also applies to humans. Those that do not get a sufficient amount of sunshine experience poorer health. Those who are daily exposed to the vitalizing effect of the sun’s rays have a ruddy complexion and more vibrant health. Sunshine is the most natural and effective antiseptic available to us. Sunshine is also one of the most effective healing agents known.

The sun unlocks the vitamins in food. Without the sun’s rays, we could not get the full value from our food. The sun’s rays gives plants the ability, through a process known as photosynthesis, to take carbon dioxide and oxygen from the air and combine these into the basic food substances by which all things live. This is done by chlorophyll, the green substance in the leaves of the plants. We are unable to duplicate, or even fully understand, this process. Energy from the sun’s rays also act on certain substances in the skin, changing them to vitamin D, one of the essential vitamins to the body.

Sunlight keeps our blood warm and pure and supplies life-giving energy to every organ of our bodies. Our brains are fed by sunshine-enhanced blood; our body is strengthened by the sun’s energy. 

More Benefits of Sunlight

1. Sunlight converts cholesterol into vitamin D, lowering the blood cholesterol. Vitamin D provides a host of advantages to the body, including prevention of many types of cancer and better calcium absorption, which in turn helps prevent osteoporosis and tooth decay, makes stronger denser bones, and speeds bone repair.

2. Sunlight kills many germs and enhances the immune system by increasing gamma globulin, and raising the number and effectiveness of the white blood cells which destroy germs. Lightly tanned skin resists germs and infection much better than untanned skin. Many skin diseases respond well to controlled doses of sunlight. For a clean, fresh bed, expose bedding to sunlight. It’s better to let the sunlight into your homes and risk a little faded furniture than to keep the shades drawn at all times. The health of the occupants is more precious than any expensive furniture.

3. Sunlight soothes the nervous system and is important in treating depression. It gives a sense of well-being by increasing endorphin production in the brain.

4. Sunlight strengthens the cardiovascular system. It improves the circulation, lowers the heart rate, and normalizes the blood pressure and blood sugar.

5. Sunlight aids in digestion and weight loss, increasing the metabolism by stimulating thyroid production.

6. Sunlight improves sleep. Natural light exposure in daytime increases melatonin output at night.

7. The sick are greatly benefited by the sun due to its healing properties. Sunlight enhances waste elimination by improving liver function; it is an effective treatment for jaundice. It relieves the kidneys of some of their burden by eliminating wastes through the skin when you sweat.

Moderate work or exercise outdoors every day will secure these benefits and more. We receive the sun’s rays even on cloudy days; however ordinary window glass filters out 95% of the useful ultraviolet light. 

Doesn’t untraviolet light cause skin cancer?

Sun should be taken in moderation. Over-exposure to sunlight is a major risk factor for skin cancer. Melanoma, a quick spreading skin cancer that is fatal in 20% of cases, is associate with lack of regular sun exposure and repeated burning of the skin. Avoid sunburn, getting your sunshine in small doses. Take great care between 10 am and 3 pm, particularly in summer when the sun is strongest.

Excessive sunshine, especially sunburn, increases your risk of skin cancer. However, sunlight provides so many benefits that avoiding it is not a healthy choice. At least ten minutes of sunlight per day is necessary to maintain good health. 

Updated July 2014.

http://amazinghealth.com/introduction-to-sunlight

4th Enad Mission

 

————————————— für deutsche Übersetzung s. unten—————————————-
 
 Hello friends of ENAD,
 
we are excited to announce the 4th ENAD Mission week in Germany! Below you will find all important information!
Since the mission week already takes place in May, don’t waste time, but contact us and join us as we try to reach out to people after the example of Jesus!
 
 
ENAD Inland Missions 2019
19.05.2019 – 26.05.2019
Like the last year we want to support Carolin Dähmlow and her center of influence “Villa Vetterlein” and the local church of Zittau, Germany in their missionary activities.
Here is a short program preview:
• Two days of Children’s Health Expo
• Presentations on healthy lifestyle and mental health for refugees
• attending a regional church conference on Sabbath
• Excursion to the Zittauer Mountainside nearby
 
Now it´s all up to YOU! We as the ENAD Missions Team and the local church of Zittau need you to get involved in this project. You don’t need any medical education to participate, everyone is welcome! 
You will have the privilege to sleep in a beautiful, more than 120 years old house. 
Please bring sleeping bags and 82€ with you. 

Please contact us for answering your remaining questions and for registration.
Mail: sophie-naumann@gmx.net
Registration Deadline is 30.04.2019
We are excited to see you soon in Zittau! 😉

Greetings & blessings
Your ENAD Inland Missions team
  
———————————-Deutsche Version——————————————
 ENAD Inland Missions 2019
19.05.2019 – 26.05.2019
 
Liebe Freunde von ENAD,
 
wir freuen uns sehr, euch nun schon zu der vierten Runde von ENAD Missions in Deutschland einladen zu dürfen.
Wie im letzten Jahr wollen wir Carolin Dähmlow mit ihrem Center of influence „Villa Vetterlein“ unterstützen und uns aktiv besonders für Flüchtlinge in Zittau einsetzen.
Da die Missionswoche bereits im Mai stattfindet, verliert keine Zeit und kontaktiert uns, um mit uns dabei zu sein und in Zittau Menschen nach dem Vorbild Jesu zu erreichen! 
Hier eine kurze Programmvorschau:
• Zwei Tage zur freien Gestaltung je nach Gaben der Teilnehmer
            Möglichkeiten wie :
            – Gesundheitsvorträge für die Bevölkerung,
            – Arbeit mit Suchtkranken
            – sportliche Aktivitäten
           
• 2 Tage Kinderhealthexpo
•  Teilnahme am Regionalgottesdienst am Sabbat
•  Ausflug ins nahegelegene Gebirge
 
Du brauchst keine medizinische Ausbildung, um an der ENAD Missionswoche teilnehmen zu können! 
Wir freuen uns über jeden, der Freude an der Mission hat. Egal, ob Alt oder Jung, sei dabei bei ENAD Missions 2019!  Anmeldeschluss ist der 30.04.2019
Wie letztes Jahr werden wir das Vorrecht haben, in einer 120jährigen Villa schlafen zu dürfen. Dazu benötigt ihr Schlafsäcke und Isomatten. Bitte bringt zu dem einen Teilnehmerbeitrag von 82€mit.
Für weitere Infos und Registrierung kontaktiert uns: sophie-naumann@gmx.net 


Wir freuen uns sehr, DICH bald in Zittau begrüßen zu dürfen! 😉

Herzliche Grüße sowie Gottes reichen Segen sendet euch
Euer ENAD Inland Missions Team
 

 

How to make your own CoQ10

Image Credit: Robert Owen-Wahl / Pixabay. This image has been modified

Chlorophyll is the green pigment that makes green leaves green. If you search for chlorophyll in the medical literature, a lot of what you find is about fecal fluorescence, a way to detect the contamination of carcasses in the slaughterhouse with feces to reduce the risk of food poisoning from pathogens harbored within animal feces. Fecal matter gets on meat either “with knife entry through the hide into the carcass, and also splash back and aerosol [airborne] deposition of fecal matter during hide removal”—that is, when they’re peeling off the skin. If, however, the animals have been eating grass, you can pick up the poo with a black light. As you can see in my video How to Regenerate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Naturally, a solution of chlorophyll is green, but, under a UV light, it lights up as red. So, if you have a black light in a chicken slaughter plant, you can get a drop on the droppings. The problem is most chickens aren’t outside anymore. They’re no longer pecking at grass so there’s less fecal fluorescence. We could let them run around outside or we could save money by just adding a chlorophyll supplement to their feed so we can better “identify areas of gut-spill contamination” on the meat.

The reason I was looking up chlorophyll was to follow-up on the data I presented in my Eating Green to Prevent Cancer video, which suggests that chlorophyll may be able to block carcinogens. I found a few in vitro studies on the potential anti-inflammatory effects of chlorophyll. After all, green leaves have long been used to treat inflammation, so anti-inflammatory properties of chlorophyll and their break-down products after digestion were put to the test. And, indeed, they may represent “valuable and abundantly available anti-inflammatory agents.” Maybe that’s one reason why cruciferous vegetables, like kale and collard greens, are associated with decreased markers of inflammation.

In a petri dish, for example, if you lay down a layer of arterial lining cells, more inflammatory immune cells stick to them after you stimulate them with a toxic substance. We can bring down that inflammation with the anti-inflammatory drug aspirin or, even more so, by just dripping on some chlorophyll. Perhaps that’s one of the reasons kale consumers appear to live longer lives.

As interesting as I found that study to be, this next study blew my mind. The most abundant energy source on this planet is sunlight. However, only plants are able to use it directly—or so we thought. After eating plants, animals have chlorophyll in them, too, so might we also be able to derive energy directly from sunlight? Well, first of all, light can’t get through our skin, right? Wrong. This was demonstrated by century-old science—and every kid who’s ever shined a flashlight through her or his fingers, showing that the red wavelengths do get through. In fact, if you step outside on a sunny day, there’s enough light penetrating your skull and going through to your brain that you could read a book in there. Okay, so our internal organs are bathed in sunlight, and when we eat green leafy vegetables, the absorbed chlorophyll in our body does actually appear to produce cellular energy. But, unless we eat so many greens we turn green ourselves, the energy produced is probably negligible.

However, light-activated chlorophyll inside our body may help regenerate Coenzyme Q10. CoQ10 is an antioxidant our body basically makes from scratch using the same enzyme we use to make cholesterol—that is, the same enzyme that’s blocked by cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. So, if CoQ10 production gets caught in the crossfire, then maybe that explains why statins increase our risk of diabetes—namely, by accidently also reducing CoQ10 levels in a friendly-fire type of event. Maybe that’s why statins can lead to muscle breakdown. Given that, should statin users take CoQ10 supplements? No, they should sufficiently improve their diets to stop taking drugs that muck with their biochemistry! By doing so—by eating more plant-based chlorophyll-rich diets—you may best maintain your levels of active CoQ10, also known as ubiquinol. “However, when ubiquinol is used as an antioxidant, it is oxidized to ubiquinone. To act as an effective antioxidant, the body must regenerate ubiquinol from ubiquinone,” perhaps by using dietary chlorophyll metabolites and light.

Researchers exposed some ubiquinone and chlorophyll metabolites to the kind of light that makes it into our bloodstream. Poof! CoQ10 was reborn. But, without the chlorophyll or the light, nothing happened. By going outside we get light and, if we’re eating our veggies, chlorophyll, so maybe that’s how we maintain such high levels of CoQ10 in our bloodstream. Perhaps this explains why dark green leafy vegetables are so good for us. We know sun exposure can be good for us and that eating greens can be good for us. “These benefits are commonly attributed to an increase in vitamin D from sunlight exposure and consumption of antioxidants from green vegetables”—but is it possible that these explanations might be incomplete?

 

https://nutritionfacts.org/2018/11/13/how-to-make-your-own-coq10/